Tag Archives: Adrian Belew

Discipline & Indiscipline

Friday is Fripp day
What a Fripp
Time to dance the Fripp.
Sometimes when I think of something to be just too great, its often something I have listened too many many times. Then I also think everyone else has and know all about it, as if it was The Beatles, Pink Floyd or Mozart. The thing is, that may often not be the case, just because I know Discipline by King Crimson, and have listened to it crazy many times, it’s not the case for everyone. If You dont, here is the chance to change that.
An album elevating the consept of Rock Music.
Elephant Talk

Stylistically the new King Crimson, is a style of music in its own, explored over three albums in the early 80’s. Having some connection what Talking Heads, David Bowie and Peter Gabriel did at the same time, but with a level of complexity on one side and minimalism on the other, that is very King Crimson, and especialy this short lived version of King Crimson.
Frame By Frame

After dropping King Crimson in 1974, Fripp did a lot of other things for the duration of the 70’s, but in 1980 he called King Crimson ex. drummer Bill Bruford, to form a new band called Discipline, they agreed to do something together. Fripp called guitarist Adrian Belew, at the time known for his work with Frank Zappa, Talking Heads and David Bowie, Belew was happy to be part of the team, he was younger, and knew of Fripp and Bruford as Progressive Rock giants.
Discipline

Fripp and Bruford went to New York, making auditions for a Bass player, a tape with a recording of a 17/8 riff, was played during audition, as to check if the bassist’s would be Discipline materiel, they should be able to play the riff. On the 3.rd day of audition Tony Levin came in, Fripp knew him from playing together at Peter Gabriel’s albums I II and III, the case was settled, Fripp later commented, that he would have expected Tony to be too busy; otherwise he would have called him without hesitation. Levin was known to also play the Chapman stick, something that would suit the project very well.
Indiscipline

Even though Fripp was unsure about the idear of renaming the Project, King Crimson, the Americans did not like “Discipline”, as that was not a term ringing well in their ears, not friendly, and Bruford would agree : Robert will talk endlessly about icons and things, but to us plain Englishmen it just seems a very good idea. In the end while still touring, they changed the band name from Discipline to King Crimson. The album was released in September 1981
The Sheltering Sky

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Hidden 80′s Gems – Part 4 1984

1984 is an absurd year in music, a year so full of good stuff coming out that it should be impossible. But I did decide to pick just one, because that is what I set out to do in the first place. The two albums I found it hardest not to choose was Hüsker Dü’s brilliant “Zen Arcade” and “Dead can Dance” unique self-titled debut. I have chosen Laurie because she was the one I bought just when it came out, the one important to me back then.

Sharkey’s Day

Laurie Anderson – Mister Heartbreak – 1984
My mother had read an article in her newspaper about this American poet, having made an album with an impressive cast of supporting musicians, she knew I was crazy about Peter Gabriel, so she showed it to me. When I also read that King Crimson guitarist Adrian Belew was playing on the album. I had to go get it.

Gravity’s Angel

Only one album, I have ever heard before this one, is based on Poetry and still work as an album, and that is Jim Morrison’s posthumous An American Prayer, it is very hard to combine spoken words and music into something listenable, but Laurie and her cast, makes it melt together, one supporting the other.
Mister Heartbreak is a journey, sunny and beautiful, dreamy and surrealistic, surprising and changing all the time, that is just the music, when you get deeper into the lyrics, things become really strange.

Kokoku

Dangerous Curves

Friday is Fripp day
What a Fripp
So lets Fripp out.

King Crimson is not just one band, have been so many constellations, with so different members, playing so different music, that it would be very hard to digest in a post, or even a few posts. On the other hand, it would be too strange to do Fripp Fridays, and continue to avoid Crimson, so what I will do, is take one little piece once in a while, and post them in between other things Fripp.

“Dangerous Curves” is a track first found on the Level Five Live “Tour EP”, released I 2001.
It is a Crimson Instrumental, starting very calm and slowly building more and more heavy, towards a climax. In this version with a strange intro of (Belew’s) spoken words, and a wonderful clean sound.

This is not found on Youtube – But i would recomand every KC lover to get it, one of the best records KC did, from the mid 80’s and onwards.

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The track appears again on the 2003 full studio album “The Power to Believe”. It is now longer, scary, darker, a nice example of how Crimson develops their material, the track had changes quite a lot. The studio production of this particular track, in my opinion, makes it a bit weaker than the cleaner “Level Five” version

From “The Power to Believe”

There is another live version, from the 2003 tour, supporting the release of “The Power to belive”.
Again we get a very different version, this time with a very raw (Belew) guitar base, an ambient texture of almost symphonic sounds, wild futuristic electronic percussions, now more robotic, industrial.

Live 2003

King Crimson, in this period:
Adrian Belew – Guitar, Vocals ; Robert Fripp – Guitar ; Trey Gunn – Warr Guitar ; Pat Mastelotto – Drums

Previous Fripp Friday January 24.