Tag Archives: electronic

Contributions by Robert (part IV)

In 1992 Fripp contributed to David Cunningham’s “Water” on a single track “Stars” – the saxophone player is Peter (Laurence) Gordon.

Fripp had already been involved with contributions to Cunningham’s group “The Flying Lizard” back in 1981. This time the music was more ambient and minimalistic.

 

Also in 1992 Fripp contributes on English electronic group The Grid’s album 456. Fripp’s plays on 3 tracks, Ice Machine, Aquarium and Fire Engine Red.

While Fripp is very evident on all the tracks, Ice Machine stands out as the most hilarious and at the same time brilliant. A must know track for any Fripp devotee. Vocals performed by Dieter Meier from Swiss band Yello.

And then, as python said, to something completely different.

 

In 1993 Fripp played on a track from Lawrence Gowan “…but you can call me Larry” sorry to say so, but to me this is very forgettable.

Anyway here it is, it might be that others will think it is great:

Lawrence Henry Gowan is a Scottish-born Canadian pianist and singer, since 1999 Gowan has been a member of legendary American rock band Styx

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1990 Anno Domini

Emigma’s 1990 debut “MCMXC a.D.” (MCMXC is the Roman numerals for 1990) is one of the important steppingstones in the development of Electronic music. At the time it was a huge hit, and a huge provocation too. With its mix of a very sexy female voice, Gregorian chants and dance beats.

The music is sort of new age chill, mostly on a soft dance beat, but yet at time very experimental. Personally I think it one of the best music experiments, able to penetrate into a mainstream audience, since Eno/Byrne’s (1981) “My Life in the Bush of Ghosts”, The music is based on a lot of samples, including rain from Black Sabbath debut, a track from Aphrodite’s Child’s album 666, and the voice of Maria Callas.

Enigma was actually not a band, more the brainchild of Romanian-born Michael Cretu.
With MCMXC a.D. he created one of the most original and controversial albums in the early 90’s, with its unique blend of religious influences, fusion of genres, and sexual references.
MCMXC a.D. is one of a kind, and even though Enigma made others albums later, is has been unsurpassed as their best effort.

Red Snapper – Acid Jazz Hop

Sit back, and relax, time for some Jazzy-Hop

From “Making Bones” 1998

Red Snapper is a British instrumental acid jazz/trip hop trio, founded in London in 1993, remarkable in their excellent use of acoustic instruments in Electronica. The three permanent members, Rich Thair (drums), Ali Friend (double bass/vocals) and David Ayers (guitar), was joined by guest musicians and singers

From Key 2011

In early 2002, Red Snapper spilt up, but in 2007 they reunited, and have since made Ep’s and an album in 2011. Their music moves from delightful low speed textures, to high speed beats. With effective melody mixed into a landscapes of electronica and hip’hop.

From “Making Bones” 1998

Morrissey – Vangelis – Nina Simone

After Aphrodite’s Child
Vangelis started his solo career and have since released a number of highly acclaimed electronic albums ,a series of collaboration with Jon Anderson from Yes, as “Jon & Vangelis” , and music for films and television, earning him an Academy Award for Best Original Score, for the 1981 British drama Chariots of Fire. Vangelis have become one of the early masters of electronic music.
Vangelis also made Music for the futuristic Ridley Scott film Blade Runner (1982). But for various reasons the original soundtrack release was delayed until 1994, despite the music being well-received by fans and critics. Today some think of this soundtrack as being Vangelis finest moment of electronic music.

The saxophone on the track was played by Dick Morrissey.
Richard Edwin “Dick” Morrissey (1940 – 2000) was a British jazz musician and composer. He played the tenor sax, soprano sax and flute. Playing in various Jazz bands and constellations, but mostly known for his British Jazz/rock, as a member of “If” (1969-1975), and later Morrissey- Mullen.
Here we have got his wonderful saxophone, in a more traditional Jazz setting.

Dick Morrissey was also part of – The Animals‘ Big Band, but they made only one public appearance at British Jazz & Blues Festival in Richmond 1965.
The Animals was an English music group , featuring the charismatic front man Eric Burdon. Best known for their version of American traditional “House of the Rising Sun”, the Animals had another major hit in early 60’s with “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood”. Originally written for Nina Simone, who first recorded it in 1964.

……………………Goosebumps…
Nina Simone (1933 –2003) was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist mostly associated with jazz music. She began recording in the late 1950s releasing her first full album in 1958, Simone’s music defied standard genre definitions. Her classical training showed through, no matter what genre of song she played, and she drew from many sources including gospel, pop and folk. She was called the “High Priestess of Soul,” or “jazz singer”. But she did not like any of those labels : “If I had to be called something, it should have been a folk singer because there was more folk and blues than jazz in my playing,” she wrote.

THE END.

Ulver : “Providence”

“Masters of Darkness” – Part 2

Norwegian band Ulver have allways been very unpredictable. From black metal to soundscapes, from symphonic to noise, a musical evolution and experimentation you find in very few bands. with a heavy reliance on electronic recording techniques.
The only clear line, is that they are almost always dark and melancholic.

From 1995-1997 they made 3, folk-themed black metal albums, Bergtatt 1995, Kveldssanger 1996, Nattens madrigal 1997, Kveldssanger with classical guitars, cello and chamber chants, less heavy , while still having a folk theme. With Themes from William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1998), came a sudden shift in style moving into a mix of electronics, industrial, avant-garde, ambient and metal, a double album of epic proportions. Since then Ulver have been all over the place, with different experiments.

“Providence” from their eighth studio album “Wars of the Roses” features Kristoffer Rygg’s deep vocals contrasted by female vocals from guest singer, Siri Stranger. A beautiful piece mixed from several styles.

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